Connect with us

Tech

Court OKs lawsuit by woman who says she helped create Pinterest

Published

on


Pinterest must now face a lawsuit from a former friend of one of its founders who claims she helped create the platform. Bloomberg reported that Alameda County Superior Court Judge Richard Seabolt on Thursday denied the company’s motion to dismiss the lawsuit. Christine Martinez, the plaintiff, claims she was asked by co-founder Ben Silbermann to help revive the app. The digital market strategist claims to have developed features tied to Pinterest’s and created a marketing plan to enlist bloggers to promote the platform, among other contributions. 

Martinez filed a lawsuit against the company in September, and Pinterest filed the motion to dismiss in December. The company argued that Martinez’s claims are too old to fall within the statute of limitations. Seabolt disagreed with this and said Martinez “sufficiently alleges” that she and the Pinterest founders agreed to deferred compensation. Pinterest went public in 2019, an event that Seabolt deemed “transformative” and in his view sealed the company’s obligation to pay Martinez.

In a statement to Engadget, Pinterest’s chief communications officer LeMia Jenkins Thompson noted that the court dismissed several of Martinez’s claims. Thompson also stated that, “as the facts come out, we are confident the evidence will confirm that Plaintiff’s claims are meritless and that the rest of this baseless lawsuit should be dismissed.” 

According to the New York Times, Martinez was never formally employed at nor did she ever sign a written contract with the San Francisco-based company. Instead, Martinez argues that the agreement was implied, based on her discussions with Sciarra and Silbermann.

Martinez, who is a former lifestyle blogger and founder of an eccomerce startup, told the Times she was eager to help friends. “[…The Pinterest co-founders] had no marketing background or expertise in creating a product for women.”

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Tech

What we bought: This LED desk lamp gave me the best lighting for video calls

Published

on


Over the past two years, my work-from-home situation morphed from temporary to permanent, and I’ve had to reconfigure my home office as a result. I purchased a standing desk, a monitor, and spent countless hours rearranging my furniture. One of my primary concerns is that I have a relatively small space, and therefore prefer things that can pull double duty. So when I decided to update my desk lamp, I knew I needed a multi-tasker that wouldn’t take up a lot of real estate. For me, the Edge Light from Lume Cube ended up being the perfect solution.

Prior to purchasing the Edge Light, I relied mostly on a lamp that I bought from CB2 nearly twenty years ago. It’s good looking but it has a large six-inch base that takes up quite a bit of space. It also doesn’t provide the right lighting environment for video calls. While it’s serviceable enough as a desk lamp, the light is just too warm and subdued for Zoom sessions. Plus, it’s not flexible enough for me to angle the light to illuminate my face properly. That’s a problem when, like most everyone else, I was suddenly having multiple video meetings a week. I really noticed it when I was a guest on a podcast; watching the video back made me realize how poor the lighting was.

Lume Cube
Lume Cube

Engadget

That prompted me to purchase a cheap ring light from Amazon, but I soon realized that was a mistake. Suddenly I had not one but two lamps taking up residence on my small desk. I knew I needed to rethink my entire lighting situation.

That’s why I was glad when I saw that Lume Cube, which is known for its portable photo/video lighting rigs, had come out with the Edge Light late last year. It’s essentially an LED desk lamp that also doubles as a video conferencing light. On top of that, it’s a clamp-on model, which means it wouldn’t take up a lot of space. It is fairly pricey at $120, but since it appeared to solve so many of my pain points, I decided it would be worth it.

I’ve now had it for a few months, and I absolutely love it. It has freed up so much real estate on my desk. It’s tall enough to position behind my webcam when I need it for video calls, and thanks to its five pivot points, I can easily swing it around so that I can use it to illuminate my desk. The lighting is fantastic, too – I can adjust both the brightness and the warmth so that it’s bright but not too harsh. According to the company, it provides multi-level diffusion for soft light and has a color adjustability between 3200 and 5600K.

Lume Cube
Lume Cube

Engadget

The controls are pretty intuitive – simply tap the circular button to switch between brightness and warmth, and then tap the plus and minus signs to adjust the levels to your liking. The buttons are all “soft touch,” meaning they don’t need any pressure. On top of that, the lamp actually comes with two charging ports – one USB-A and one USB-C – which I am always using to charge up all of my various devices and accessories.

Perhaps my one complaint is that the light does produce a tiny bit of glare on my glasses when it’s positioned directly in front of me. The company suggests getting two Edge Light lamps to reduce this effect, but that’s a little too rich for my blood. I’ve since managed to angle the light so that the glare isn’t as bad, which is good enough for me.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.



Source link

Continue Reading

Tech

Locke and Key season 3 review: it ends with a whimper

Published

on


When it debuted in 2020, Netflix’s live-action adaptation of Locke and Key got off to a pretty good start. Based on the brilliant comic series from Joe Hill and Gabriel Rodríguez, the show tells the story of the Locke family and their sprawling ancestral home in Massachusetts that also happens to be home to some very cool magical keys. The first season of the show mixed the comic’s dark family drama and fantastical premise with some high-school hijinks ripped right out of Riverdale. But with season two, a lack of a great villain and a sped-up pace took away from what made the show so interesting — namely the magic and the mystery. Now, the series is back with a third and final season that attempts to wrap things up once and for all. But despite some good ideas, it’s not the course correction Locke and Key really needed.

This review contains spoilers for the third season of Locke and Key.

Season 3 picks up right where the previous one left off, which means that — at least initially — the Locke family is living life as if everything is normal. But there are some important changes. Older brother Tyler (Connor Jessup) is off building houses in Montana after an aimless road trip, and more importantly, he’s living a simple life after voluntarily deciding to purge any magical memories from his brain. On the other end of the spectrum, Locke mom Nina (Darby Stanchfield) has used the keys to restore her memory of magic so she doesn’t feel so separated from the rest of her family. (In the Locke and Key universe, everyone naturally forgets about the existence of magic once they hit adulthood unless you make use of a special key.)

Early on, Tyler returns home for his uncle’s wedding and things get pretty awkward since he doesn’t remember any of the big life events that happened over the past two seasons. There isn’t much to say to his little brother Bode (Jackson Robert Scott) and sister Kinsey (Emilia Jones), and he gets pretty suspicious that everyone is keeping something from him. He’s forced back into it all again, though, because — as the finale of season 2 teased — we now have a new villain in the form of Frederick Gideon (Kevin Durand), a British soldier from colonial Massachusetts who, in the modern day, has been possessed by a powerful demon. The main thing you need to know is that Gideon wants to use the keys to collapse the wall between our world and the glowing blue realm of demons — for reasons that are never entirely clear.

There are a few things the new season does well. For starters, there’s the introduction of new keys that are full of possibility; just like in the early days of Locke and Key, it’s a lot of fun to learn about the keys and what they can do. In season 3, we’re introduced to a time-travel key with some very important limitations and a key-powered snow globe with the potential to trap victims indefinitely. As always, these keys “whisper” to the Locke family whenever the time is right for them to appear. I also really enjoyed some of the more imaginative scenes, when the head key — which literally lets you venture into someone’s mind — is put to use. Much of the show’s climax takes place in the brain of a hardcore theater kid, which makes it extra, well, extra. There are some great performances here, too, most notably from Scott as Bode; he’s as obnoxious as ever, but he also takes a detour as a surprisingly effective villain, giving some strong Chucky vibes.

But all of that is mostly undone by the rest of the show. For one thing, despite the seemingly straightforward premise, things are far too complicated. At this point in the story, you pretty much need a spreadsheet to keep track of what’s going on with everyone. You have to worry about the powers and locations of the various keys and who does and doesn’t remember magic as well as the fact that certain characters have changed their body or appearance. I often had to pause the show to try to remember some of the logistical details.

More important, though, is the fact that, just like in season 2, the new villain sucks. Gideon isn’t as bad as the extremely unscary Gabe (Griffin Gluck), but that’s not saying much. When the big baddie both looks and sounds goofy, it’s hard to ever feel too worried about the safety of the Lockes. It’s especially disappointing because season 1 had an incredible villain in Dodge (Laysla De Oliveira), who was equal parts menacing and manipulative; sadly, she only makes a brief appearance in the story’s concluding chapter.

Perhaps it’s a good thing that season 3 is mercifully short. It’s only eight episodes long, compared to the 10 of previous seasons, and a few episodes are only around half an hour long. The show doesn’t take long to get to its conclusion, which wraps things up a little too neatly for my liking. As with season 2, it’s not like the new episodes of Locke and Key are bad, per se; they’re just okay — which, given the source material and its fascinating premise, means they’re quite the disappointment.

Season 3 of Locke and Key starts streaming on Netflix on August 9th.

Disclosure: The Verge recently produced a series with Netflix.



Source link

Continue Reading

Tech

Anker charging gadgets are up to 40 percent off for Prime members

Published

on


Now’s a good time to pick up a new charger for your phone, tablet and other devices while a number of Anker’s charging accessories are down to record-low prices for Amazon Prime members. Standouts among the discounts are Anker’s 521 magnetic battery pack for MagSafe-compatible iPhones, which is 40 percent off and on sale for $30, and Anker’s 511 2-in-1 power bank, which is 30 percent off and down to $35.

Shop Anker deals at Amazon
Buy Anker 521 magnetic battery pack at Amazon – $30
Buy Anker 511 2-in-1 power bank at Amazon – $35

Both portable batteries have a 5,000 mAh capacity, but they’re each versatile in their own ways. The 521 magnetic power pack will snap onto the backs of the latest iPhones, charging them up wirelessly. It’ll provide almost a full extra charge for your iPhone, depending on the model you have, and it’ll even snap on and power up the handset when it has a MagSafe case on it.

The 511 battery pack is essentially a wall charger and a portable battery in one. If you’re near an AC outlet, it can act as a USB-C adapter for all of your mobile devices — provided you have a USB-C charging cable with you. And when you’re not near a power source, you can use its built-in battery to charge up your gadgets. Unlike the 512 magnetic pack, the 511 battery will work with iPhones as well as Google Pixel smartphones, Samsung devices and others.

Prime members can also get the Anker Nano Pro 20W charger with a USB-C to Lightning cable for $28, which is 30 percent off its usual rate. The bundle gives you everything you need to charge your iPhone as quickly as possible, and we like that Anker’s 20W adapter is more compact than Apple’s version. Other accessories on sale include the 623 MagGo 2-in-1 wireless charging station, which you can pick up for a record low of $70, and a two-pack of wireless charging stands, which is on sale for $35.

Anker Nano Pro 20W charger bundle at Amazon – $28
Buy Anker 623 MagGo charging station at Amazon – $70
Buy Anker wireless charging stands (2 pack) at Amazon – $35

Follow @EngadgetDeals on Twitter and subscribe to the Engadget Deals newsletter for the latest tech deals and buying advice.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.





Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Bitcoin1 min ago

Crypto lending platform Hodlnaut suspends services due to liquidity crisis

Ethereum16 mins ago

Bitcoin price targets 8-week highs as Ethereum reaches $1.8K

Personal Finance19 mins ago

Hot Deals on Top Brands for Back to College!

NFT21 mins ago

Peckshield Calls Rug Pull on Dubious Dragoma Activity

Metaverse22 mins ago

Explore the Metaverse with the Advancements in Technology to See What Is Possible at SIGGRAPH 2022

Economy29 mins ago

Waiting for Pivot | Financial Times

Tech31 mins ago

What we bought: This LED desk lamp gave me the best lighting for video calls

Business33 mins ago

Has US inflation peaked? 5 things to know in Bitcoin this week

Real Estate34 mins ago

New Survey Finds Inflation, Housing Costs And Eviction Threats Hitting Minorities Hardest

Opinion41 mins ago

Teens call on Supernanny for help! | The Chapman Family | Supernanny USA

Markets47 mins ago

Australian house prices dropping at 'fastest rate' since 2008 | The Business | ABC News

Personal Finance1 hour ago

Up to 48% off Hand2Mind and Learning Resources School Supplies!

NFT1 hour ago

The Music NFT Show: Podcast Episode 14

Metaverse1 hour ago

Unity Earnings Preview: What Metaverse Investors Should Keep an Eye On

Economy2 hours ago

Demography is not destiny | Financial Times

Tech2 hours ago

Locke and Key season 3 review: it ends with a whimper

Real Estate2 hours ago

VanTrust Real Estate breaks ground on 1-million-square-foot building in Louisville

Opinion2 hours ago

Pelosi's Controversial Taiwan Trip, Biden's Big News and Trump's Confusing Endorsement

Markets2 hours ago

🔴 Final Trade Live Updates: Stock Market | Share Market Live | Latest Business News CNBC Awaaz LIVE

Personal Finance2 hours ago

*HOT* Bentgo Classic Bento Box Set only $8.99 + shipping!

Economy2 weeks ago

Ukraine shifts gear with debt deals as war takes toll on finances

Metaverse4 weeks ago

Union Bank of India Jumps Into Metaverse World, Bitcoin Down 4%, Ethereum Falls 3%

Business4 weeks ago

The ultimate guide to Miami – Cointelegraph Magazine

NFT4 weeks ago

Have There Really Been Major NFT Advancements in the Last Year?

Metaverse4 weeks ago

Metaverse in E-commerce Market: North America to Occupy 38% Market Share, Market Dynamics, Vendor Assessment & Segmentation Analysis

Metaverse4 weeks ago

Ripple Concludes New Partnership to Create Open Metaverse

Metaverse4 weeks ago

Metaverse Market to Surpass US$ 993.86 Billion by 2030, Says The Brainy Insights

Economy4 weeks ago

Valuations are turning realistic but risks remain

Economy4 weeks ago

FirstFT: Japan’s ruling coalition set for victory after Abe assassination

Opinion4 weeks ago

Breaking News: Eknath Shinde Plans To Seek Legal Opinion; Sena To Oppose No Confidence Motion

NFT4 weeks ago

Decentraland to Host the Santander X Global Challenge Awards

NFT4 weeks ago

EY-ZERO1- The Inaugural NFT Collection from Etihad

NFT4 weeks ago

Your Earth DAO – Solution for High-End Metaverse Building

NFT4 weeks ago

How to Validate the Authenticity of an NFT

NFT4 weeks ago

Absorb a Piece of High Culture at the African Museum in Voxels

NFT4 weeks ago

Upcoming Drops: July 11-17

Bitcoin4 weeks ago

Capitulation ongoing but markets not at the bottom yet: Glassnode

Bitcoin2 weeks ago

Will the Fed prevent BTC price from reaching $28K? — 5 things to know in Bitcoin this week

Bitcoin4 weeks ago

Grayscale legal officer says Bitcoin ETF litigation could take two years

NFT2 weeks ago

Here’s How to Avoid Controversy With Posthumous NFT Launches

Trending

0